Agreement Is Deemed

This phrase often appears in contracts, but can be quite difficult to understand, as it has two different meanings. First, “provided that” is used to express a conditional sentence, for example in the following “conceptual clause” of a distribution contract: an unde concluded contract is a formal agreement that is effectively illegitimate and unenforceable from the date of its creation. A void contract is different from a countervailable contract, because while a void contract was legally valid from the outset (and will not be applicable at any time), countervailable contracts may be legally enforceable once the underlying defects in the contract have been corrected. At the same time, contracts not concluded and countervailable contracts may be cancelled for similar reasons. This Agreement may be executed in several considerations, each of which is an original and all considered together as the same agreement. Even so, in some states, such as California, unsolicited valuables are considered an unconditional gift and therefore their use or inaction is not considered the reason for accepting an exchange of value. When is a contract considered fulfilled or respected? Following all the questions referred to in point 6.3, the date on which the deed of transmission was executed by the notary shall be considered as the date on which the deed of transmission was executed. A contract can also be cancelled if a change in law or regulation occurs after the conclusion of an agreement, but before the performance of the contract, if the legal activities previously described in the document are now considered illegal. While an undefeated contract is often considered unfeasible, a contract may be considered questionable if the agreement is questionable, but the circumstances of the agreement are questionable. This includes agreements entered into where a party has withheld information or deliberately provided inaccurate information. Failure to disclose things like the law or misplace information may make the contract countervailable, but does not automatically invalidate it. In cases where one party may terminate the contract due to unlawful or unfair (countervailable) acts of the other party, the contract or agreement is cancelled.

The fiction generated by the use of Deem has a solid and constraining effect. However, if such a condition is considered to be fulfilled or if such a fact or event is considered to have occurred, the party concerned by such a fiction could well argue and prove that the condition considered to be fulfilled is not actually fulfilled or that a fact or event considered to have occurred is actually lacking. . . .